Taking some me time is crucial for moms. (Getty Images)

Now that school has started, and moms have worked to get into a rhythm, one of the many things I have heard from my friends is that they are going about their day, yet there are days when we all miss other mothers’ connection. 

There is a sense that something feels a bit adrift. Although experts can share how to manage these moments, it is also helpful knowing how other moms are working through their funks in the time of COVID-19. We asked a few moms to share what brings them some joy, whether it is in self-care, connecting with friends, or just taking in the quiet of the morning.

“My girlfriends and I have made a habit of finding a funny parenting meme or short video and sharing it via text at the start of each week,” says Denise Courter of Fidi Families. “It’s a great way to laugh and remind ourselves that we are all in this together, and though we might not see each other, we are still there for each other.”

Sasadi Odunsi of Brooklyn Bead Collective and ambassador for Every Mom Counts, emphasizes the need for self-care.

“I think the phrase that I keep coming back to is one that was shared with me as a new mom navigating my way, and that is, put on your oxygen mask first,” she says. “As mothers, we are continually giving and taking care, but we need to remember to take care of ourselves as well. If we don’t take time to breathe and refuel, we’ll start to break down and not be able to take care of everyone else as well. 

“Self-care is so different for everyone; for me, it usually means doing some kind of movement, whether it be high intensity for even 15 minutes, or doing something that is just for me and my sanity,” she adds. “It’s also taking time to be creative and sit down to make something. For you, it might be getting into bed earlier than usual with a good book or watching a show.”

Kaity Velez, parenting writer and creative strategizer, agrees.

“After months of being in survival mode, I’ve found that carving out me time is crucial when most of the day is spent doing brain gymnastics between work and parenting,” she says. “For me, that means getting up a little earlier for an early morning walk when the streets are still quiet. There’s no motive other than to move and be with my surroundings.”

This article first appeared in New York Family.

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