A breast cancer survivor participates in Susan Komen 3-Day walk in 2015. © 2016 Susan G. Komen.

Jane Altman of Holbrook vowed 12 years ago to participate in an annual two-day walk to help raise money for breast cancer research — and she won’t let the event being canceled stop her.

Instead of giving up after the Avon39 Walk to End Breast Cancer was nixed last year, Altman has now set her sights on an even more challenging charitable event: The 60-mile Susan G. Komen 3-Day.

“I couldn’t not do something,” Altman wrote in her fundraising appeal. “There is still a fight to fight. While the Avon39 will always be in my heart, I have refocused my efforts.”

Altman plans to join the Philadelphia leg of the walk, which runs Sept. 28-30. Six other three-day, 60-mile walks are scheduled for cities nationwide between August and November. It is organized by the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, the largest nonprofit in the nation dedicated to the cause.

Altman was inspired to walk after her close friend, Patty Spitzler, was diagnosed with stage-three breast cancer. Shortly after she began fundraising for that walk, Altman’s mother, Judy Willens, was also diagnosed. Altman now walks in honor of these survivors and in the memory of Lori Schlussel. 

“Too many other friends and family members have been diagnosed, are still fighting for their lives, or have tragically passed away,” said Altman’s husband, Adam. “Jane wears a pink breast cancer awareness ribbon inscribed with each of their names, and the names of all those she has encountered on the way, fighters all, some survivors, some still fighting, and some sadly having lost their fight. She wears one ribbon for each of them, in tribute to their courage, and as a reminder that we still have a long way to go before putting an end to this terrible disease.”

Those that participate in the walk generally aim to raise $2,300 each to further the group’s goal of cutting the number of annual breast cancer deaths in half by 2026. 

“That’s why I’m walking, and raising money,” Jane said. “To make that goal a reality.”

Altman had already nearly reached her goal of raising $3,700 more than a month before the walk.

To donate, visit Jane Altman’s online fundraiser here.

 

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Timothy Bolger is the Editor in Chief of the Long Island Press who’s been working to uncover unreported stories since shortly after it launched in 2003. When he’s not editing, getting hassled by The Man or fielding cold calls to the newsroom, he covers crime, general interest and political news in addition to reporting longer, sometimes investigative features. He won’t be happy until everyone is as pissed off as he is about how screwed up Lawn Guyland is.