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Kamala Harris Accepts Historic VP Nomination

U.S. Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) accepts the Democratic vice presidential nomination during an acceptance speech delivered for the largely virtual 2020 Democratic National Convention from the Chase Center in Wilmington, Delaware, U.S., August 19, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

By John Whitesides and James Oliphant

U.S. Senator Kamala Harris accepted the Democratic nomination for vice president on Wednesday, imploring Americans to elect Joe Biden in November and accusing President Donald Trump of failed leadership that had cost lives and livelihoods during a pandemic.

Making history as the first Black woman and Asian-American on a major U.S. presidential ticket, Harris said Trump’s divisive leadership had brought the country to an “inflection point” and made a direct appeal to the party’s diverse electorate whose vote is crucial to defeat Trump on Nov. 3.

“The constant chaos leaves us adrift, the incompetence makes us feel afraid, the callousness makes us feel alone. It’s a lot,” the California senator and former prosecutor said, speaking from an events center in Biden’s hometown of Wilmington, Delaware, that was largely empty because of the coronavirus outbreak.

“We must elect a president… who will bring all of us together — Black, White, Latino, Asian, Indigenous — to achieve the future we collectively want. We must elect Joe Biden,” she said.

Former U.S. President Barack Obama, speaking just before Harris, also delivered a sharp rebuke of his Republican successor, saying Trump had used the power of his office only to “help himself and his friends.”

Obama, whose vice president was Biden from 2009-2017, said he had hoped that Trump would take the job seriously, come to feel the weight of the office, and discover a reverence for American democracy.

“For close to four years now he has shown no interest in putting in the work… no interest in treating the presidency as anything but one more reality show that he can use to get the attention he craves,” Obama said, in unusually sharp criticism of a sitting president by a former president.

Harris‘ nomination capped the third night of a party convention that has featured a crush of women headliners, moderators and speakers, showcasing the growing power of women in politics and in the Democratic Party. Biden leads Trump in opinion polls, bolstered by a big lead among women voters.

Biden, 77, would be the oldest person to become president if he is elected, leading to speculation he will serve only one term. The nomination for vice presidency would make Harris, 55, a potential top contender for 2024.

The speech by Harris served as a reintroduction to the country after her unsuccessful White House bid. Harris outlined her background as a child of immigrants from India and Jamaica who as a district attorney, state attorney general and now vice-presidential candidate shattered gender and racial barriers.

She said she was able to make history because of the trailblazing efforts of women before her who fought for the right to vote.

“That I am here tonight is a testament to the dedication of generations before me,” she said. “They ​organized​, marched​, and ​fought ​— not just for their ​vote​, but for a ​seat​ at the table.”

‘NO MATTER WHAT, VOTE’

Trump issued three tweets in all capital letters during the last half of the convention program, angrily criticizing Harris and Obama and questioning their allegiance to Biden.

In a speech from the Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia, Obama warned Trump and Republicans were trying to make it harder for Americans to vote and called Trump’s leadership a threat to democracy.

“We can’t let that happen. Don’t let them take away your democracy. Make a plan right now for how you’re going to get involved and vote,” Obama said.

Democrats have been alarmed by Trump’s frequent criticism of mail-in voting, and by cost-cutting changes at the U.S. Postal Service instituted by Postmaster General Louis DeJoy, a Trump supporter, that could delay mail during the election crunch. DeJoy said this week he would put off those changes until after the election.

Hillary Clinton, the 2016 Democratic presidential nominee who lost to Trump, told the convention she constantly hears from voters who regret backing Trump or not voting at all. She won the popular vote against Trump but lost in the Electoral College that determines the U.S. presidency.

“This can’t be another woulda coulda shoulda election,” she said. “No matter what, vote. Vote like our lives and livelihoods are on the line, because they are.”

Clinton said Biden needs to win overwhelmingly.

“Joe and Kamala can win by 3 million votes and still lose,” she said. “Take it from me. So we need numbers overwhelming so Trump can’t sneak or steal his way to victory.”

Throughout the convention, Democrats have appealed directly to women voters, highlighting Biden’s co-sponsorship of the landmark Violence Against Woman Act of 1994 and his proposals to bolster childcare and protect family healthcare provisions.

U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren, a leading progressive who ran against Biden in the 2020 primary, spoke from a childcare center in Massachusetts that is now closed because of the coronavirus. She cited Biden’s proposal to make childcare more affordable as a vital part of his agenda to help working Americans.

“COVID-19 was Trump’s biggest test. He failed miserably,” Warren said. “Joe and Kamala will make high-quality childcare affordable for every family, make preschool universal, and raise the wages for every childcare worker.”

Biden named Harris as his running mate last week to face incumbents Trump, 74, and Vice President Mike Pence, 61. The Republican National Convention, also largely virtual, takes place next week.

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U.S. Postal Chief Pauses Changes Until After Election Day Following Uproar

U.S. postal workers load their trucks as they begin their day during the outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Carlsbad, California, U.S., August 17, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Blake

By David Shepardson

U.S. Postmaster General Louis DeJoy on Tuesday suspended all mail service changes until after the November election, bowing to an outcry by Democrats that the moves appeared to be an attempt to boost President Donald Trump’s re-election chances.

The reversal follows complaints that the cuts could slow the handling of mail-in ballots, which could account for as many as half of all votes cast in the Nov. 3 election as the coronavirus pandemic raises fears of crowds.

Critics have accused the Republican president, trailing Democratic challenger Joe Biden in opinion polls, of trying to hobble the Postal Service to suppress mail-in voting.

Trump has repeatedly and without evidence said that an increase in mail-in ballots would lead to a surge in fraud, although Americans have long voted by mail.

Planned changes to the mail service that threatened to slow mail delivery – and in some cases, already have – include reductions in overtime, restrictions on extra mail transportation trips, and new mail sorting and delivery policies, enacted in an attempt to cut costs.

“I am suspending these initiatives until after the election is concluded,” DeJoy said in a statement, adding that the changes were to “avoid even the appearance of any impact on election mail.”

Reuters reported news of the suspension first on Tuesday.

The White House distanced itself from the controversy.

“No, I was not involved,” Trump said when asked if he had any involvement in the decision not to go forward with the changes at this time. He spoke to reporters in Yuma, Arizona, where he was visiting a border barrier.

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows said Trump never directed postal operational changes that would slow mail deliveries.

U.S. House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi called DeJoy’s announcement inadequate and said she would push ahead with legislation later this week to aid the Postal Service.

“This pause only halts a limited number of the postmaster’s changes, does not reverse damage already done, and alone is not enough to ensure voters will not be disenfranchised by the president” in the election, Pelosi said in a statement.

“The House will be moving ahead with our vote this Saturday,” she said. The legislation is expected to contain provisions to prevent the post office from reducing service levels below what they were in January.

DeJoy, a major political donor and ally of Trump, assumed the job in June. His recent operational changes had brought widespread criticism.

Mark Dimondstein, president of the American Postal Workers Union, praised “the postmaster’s reversal of these policies” but added that the Postal Service was still “in immediate need of $25 billion in COVID-related financial relief.”

The coronavirus pandemic has placed increased pressure on the already ailing Postal Service as it gears up to handle increased volume from the anticipated surge in mail-in ballots in November.

Trump said last week he was against Democratic efforts to include funds for the Postal Service and election infrastructure in coronavirus relief legislation because he wanted to limit mail-in voting during the pandemic.

The president kept up his attack on mail voting on Tuesday, speculating that delayed results could mean that the election would need to be held a second time.

“It will end up being a rigged election or they will never come out with an outcome,” Trump told reporters on Tuesday. “They’ll have to do it again, and nobody wants that.”

One in four ballots in 2016 was cast by mail and Trump himself votes that way.

STATES GO TO COURT

Multiple Democrats and union officials welcomed the news but said they were holding out for proof that DeJoy would take the actions he promised.

Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said in a statement that he had demanded that DeJoy provide a written document specifying the changes he is rescinding, along with “an explicit confirmation that all election mail will continue to be treated as First Class priority.”

In a complaint filed in federal court, Washington and 13 other U.S. states accused DeJoy of ignoring congressionally mandated procedures by imposing “transformative” changes at the Postal Service.

“Voting by mail is safe and promotes no partisan advantage,” the complaint said. “The states are entitled to a declaration that the ‘transformative’ changes are unlawful.”

Several congressional Republicans this week had dismissed Democrats’ concerns as a political attack on Trump.

The reversal followed a lengthy call by the postal board of governors on Monday night, two people briefed on the matter said. They said the board told DeJoy to focus only on election integrity between now and Election Day, not operational changes.

DeJoy is scheduled to testify on Friday before a Republican-led Senate committee, and before a Democratic-led House committee on Monday.

Related Story: Long Island Lawmakers Warn Trump’s Postal Service Cuts May Sway Election

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Robert Trump, President’s Brother From Long Island, Dies

U.S. President Donald Trump arrives at the New York Presbyterian Hospital to visit his younger brother Robert Trump in New York City, U.S., August 14, 2020. REUTERS/Sarah Silbiger

By Steve Holland

Robert Trump, the younger brother of U.S. President Donald Trump and a business executive who avoided the spotlight, died on Saturday night, a day after the president visited him in a New York hospital.

President Trump announced the death in a statement.

“It is with heavy heart I share that my wonderful brother, Robert, peacefully passed away tonight. He was not just my brother, he was my best friend,” the president said.

“He will be greatly missed, but we will meet again. His memory will live on in my heart forever. Robert, I love you. Rest in peace,” Trump said.

Robert Trump, who at 71 was younger than the 74-year-old president, was a business executive and real estate developer who lived on Long Island. Unlike his reality TV star brother, Robert Trump shunned the limelight.

President Trump made an emotional visit to see his ailing brother on Friday at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center before going to his golf club at Bedminster, New Jersey, for the weekend.

The president was expected to attend the funeral, an aide said. He has a busy travel schedule in coming days with plans to visit four battleground states as part of his re-election campaign.

The cause of death was not revealed. Trump told reporters on Friday that his brother was “having a hard time” with an undisclosed illness. A person familiar with the situation said the brother had been on blood thinners.

ABC News had reported that Robert Trump was hospitalized in the intensive care unit at Mount Sinai hospital in New York for more than a week in June.

That month, Robert Trump won a temporary restraining order against his and the president’s niece, Mary Trump, to stop her from publishing a tell-all book that offered an unflattering look of the president and his family.

A state supreme court judge in Poughkeepsie, New York, later denied a request to stop publication and canceled the temporary restraining order.

Robert Trump had said the book, Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man, would violate a confidentiality agreement tied to the estate of his father Fred Trump Sr, who died in 1999.

The New York Post reported in March that Robert Trump had married his second wife, Ann Marie Pallan, and that they lived in a multimillion dollar home in Garden City.

Two of Donald Trump’s children expressed sadness about their uncle’s death.

“Robert Trump was an incredible man – strong, kind and loyal to the core. Anyone who encountered him felt his warmth immediately. He will be deeply missed by our entire family,” said Eric Trump in a tweet.

“Uncle Robert, we love you. You are in our hearts and prayers, always,” tweeted Ivanka Trump.

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Trump’s Ex-Lawyer and Lawrence Native Michael Cohen Says He’ll Reveal Presidents’s ‘Skeletons’ in Upcoming Book

Michael Cohen, former personal lawyer for U.S. President Donald Trump, arrives at his Manhattan apartment after being released from federal prison to serve the remainder of his sentence under home confinement in New York City, New York U.S. July 24, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid/File Photo

By Karen Freifeld

Michael Cohen, U.S. President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer and fixer originally from Lawrence, on Thursday promised to show how Trump cheated in the 2016 election with Russian help in an upcoming book titled Disloyal, A Memoir.

“Trump had cheated in the election, with Russian connivance, as you will discover in these pages, because doing anything — and I mean anything — to ‘win’ has always been his business model and way of life,” Cohen writes in the book’s foreword, which was published online on Thursday.

The 3,700-word foreword does not reveal anything new about Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election, and it was not clear if the book would.

Former Special Counsel Robert Mueller last year concluded that Russia waged a major campaign to help Trump to victory in 2016.

Mueller did not find evidence of a criminal conspiracy between Trump’s campaign and Russia, but he did detail extensive contacts between the campaign and Russian operatives.

Cohen worked closely with Trump for years before turning against him, most publicly in testimony to Congress last year prior to Trump’s impeachment.

Cohen said he knows where Trump’s metaphorical “skeletons” are buried because he buried them.

White House spokesman Brian Morgenstern responded by attacking Cohen’s credibility.

“He readily admits to lying routinely but expects people to believe him now so that he can make money from book sales. It’s unfortunate that the media is exploiting this sad and desperate man to attack President Trump,” Morgenstern said.

Trump has called Cohen “a rat,” and a liar, and Cohen said he faced repeated death threats from Trump supporters.

Cohen, 53, is serving a three-year sentence for tax evasion, false statements and campaign finance violations, the last related to payments to silence women who alleged affairs with Trump before the 2016 presidential election.

Cohen was released to home confinement in May given the risks of catching COVID-19 in prison, but then was briefly imprisoned again last month.

A federal judge last month ruled Cohen had been subjected to retaliation for planning to publish his book, and ordered him released again.

A lawyer for Cohen declined to comment. The book is due to be released Sept. 8.

Related Story: Trump Tweets Support For Long Island Pizzeria Amid Flag Controversy  

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Cuomo Adds 3 More States, D.C., and Puerto Rico To Travel Advisory

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo speaks in front of stacks of medical protective supplies during a news conference at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center which will be partially converted into a temporary hospital during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in New York City, New York, U.S., March 24, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Tuesday ordered those arriving in New York from an additional three states, Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico to quarantine for 14 days to limit the spread of the novel coronavirus.

The states of Illinois, Kentucky, and Minnesota were added to the travel order which was first issued in June. The District of Columbia and the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico were also added.

Travelers arriving in New York from a total of 34 states are now required to quarantine, Cuomo said.

The full list now includes Alaska, Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, North Carolina, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nevada, Ohio, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, South, Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin.

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An Introvert’s Guide to Zoom: 4 Tips For Remote Meetings

Nigerian teacher, Emmanuel Ntaji, speaks to his students during an e-learning class via Zoom app, at his home, during a lockdown imposed by the authorities to limit the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Lagos, Nigeria April 23, 2020. (REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja/File Photo)

By Chris Taylor

Jia Wertz may be a documentary filmmaker in New York City, but these days she feels like a full-time resident of Zoom world.

The director of the new documentary short Conviction finds herself on a video chat every single day, often multiple times, since the pandemic has upended all our lives. As a self-described introvert, she is having a hard time getting a handle on the new medium.

“With Zoom calls, you’re ‘on’ 100 percent of the time, which is so mentally draining,” says Wertz, who juggles a scampering two-year-old at the same time.

In this era of nonstop video-conferencing, you are not alone in feeling like you have just run a marathon or been hit by a truck. Many employees and managers are reporting that online video-conferences seem particularly taxing – often more so than in-person meetings.

“I’m an introvert, and they totally drain me,” says Hannah Morgan, a job search strategist in Rochester, New York, and founder of Career Sherpa.

Why do Zoom meetings seem so fatiguing? Just think about all the information being processed: There might be five or 10 or 20 participants online at the same time, like a “Brady Bunch” title sequence from hell. Since much of communication is nonverbal – like facial expressions and body language – you are interpreting such signals for multiple colleagues simultaneously.

Meanwhile there are other issues to unravel, like tone, pitch as well as silences and their meaning. Plus, people often talk over one another.

For extroverts who thrive in that kind of buzzy cocktail party-like format, that communication style might not seem so foreign. But for introverts who are at their best one-on-one, in a quieter environment, Zoom can feel like an overload.

We are not just talking about one or two isolated employees: From one-third to one-half of the U.S. population can be considered introverts, according to Susan Cain, author of the bestselling book Quiet.

That being said, this New Normal is something we will all have to get used to. According to a survey by Wainhouse Research, 57 percent of companies are now using Zoom, compared to 30 percent before the pandemic – a growth spurt almost overnight.

And working from home doesn’t look like it will be going away anytime soon. The Society for Human Resource Management and Oxford Economics found that a whopping 64 percent of salaried and 49 percent of hourly employees now working from home most of the time, compared to only 3 percent and 2 percent back in January.

So how can introverts adapt to a Zoomified world, without harming their career prospects or having to morph into a completely different personality? Here are four ideas for employees and managers:

MAKE VIDEO OPTIONAL

Video chats can make you feel like you are constantly onstage. Hold occasional meetings that are audio-only, or where the camera can be directed away so you are not always onscreen.

DEVELOP THE SKILL SETS OF CHAT LEADERS

In any in-person meeting, there is a natural mix of quieter people and louder people. Now managers need to become adept at eliciting the participation of introverts without putting them on the spot. Use the chatbox feature, where you can enter thoughts by text that can then be taken up by the group.

LIMIT THE NUMBER OF MEETINGS

Near the beginning of the COVID-19 lockdowns, staffers may have felt obligated to participate in every single staff meeting, in order to feel connected and relevant. Being more selective now can preserve your energy, and improve your contributions for the ones you remain in.

For managers, consider: “Could this meeting have been an e-mail?” asks Brea Giffin, marketing director for Toronto-based corporate wellness platform Sprout, who also suggests scheduling buffer times between Zoom meetings. “Be conscious of how often you’re using the tool.”

THINK LIKE A BROADCASTER

The reality of the current situation is that elements of presentation like good lighting, a professional background, a decent microphone, camera angles, posture, voice projection – “all that stuff matters,” Morgan says. “With a few minor adjustments, you will come across much better on camera – and reduce your own anxiety about how you look.”

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Cuomo Adds 10 States To Quarantine Order

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo speaks in front of stacks of medical protective supplies during a news conference at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center which will be partially converted into a temporary hospital during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in New York City, New York, U.S., March 24, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Tuesday ordered those arriving in New York from an additional 10 states to quarantine for 14 days to limit the spread of the novel coronavirus as cases flare up across the country.

Alaska, Delaware, Indiana, Maryland, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, Nebraska, Virginia, Washington were added to the travel order which was first issued in June. Minnesota was removed.

Travelers arriving in New York from a total of 31 U.S. states are now required to quarantine upon arrival in New York, according to the travel advisory.

The full list now includes Alaska, Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, North Carolina, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nevada, Ohio, Oklahoma, South, Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin.

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Cuomo Warns of Reopening Rollback if New Yorkers Continue Partying in Large Groups

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo speaks in front of stacks of medical protective supplies during a news conference at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center which will be partially converted into a temporary hospital during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in New York City, New York, U.S., March 24, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar

By Gabriella Borter

New York State Gov. Andrew Cuomo said on Monday that local governments and police departments were failing to disband parties that violated social distancing orders and warned that he might need to roll back the state’s reopening if that continued.

The warning came after a warm summer weekend when people across New York City were seen gathered in groups of hundreds partying outdoors at bars and restaurants, some not wearing masks.

“The police department is not there to inform them of mask compliance,” Cuomo said at a news conference. “Police departments have to enforce the law.”

Calling out no one in particular, but referencing New York City and Long Island repeatedly, Cuomo told elected leaders that while enforcing guidelines may come with added unpopularity, a potential increase in the spread would be far worse.

“We will have to roll back the bar and restaurant opening if the congregations continue, if the local governments don’t stop it,” he added.

New York‘s coronavirus hospitalizations fell to the lowest level since March 18, with 716 total on Sunday, Cuomo said. The state’s infection rate was around 1% on Sunday.

New York City was slated to move into phase 4 of reopening on Monday, including the opening of botanical gardens and zoos, but last week the governor delayed the resumption of indoor service at bars and restaurants in the city to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks.

“Don’t be stupid,” Cuomo said, scolding the congregants and the bars that welcome them. “What they’re doing is stupid and reckless for themselves and for other people, and it has to stop.”

-With amNewYork Metro

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NY To Invest $750M To Expand Electric-Vehicle Infrastructure

A BMW M plug-in hybrid electric vehicle is seen during the media day of the 41st Bangkok International Motor Show on July 14, 2020. (REUTERS/Jorge Silva)

New York State Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Thursday announced an investment program that would allocate $750 million to build charging stations and other electric-vehicle infrastructure as part of the state’s long-term goal to reduce emissions.

The measure is set to create more than 50,000 charging stations and will largely be funded by the state’s investor-owned utility companies, with the total budget capped at $701 million through 2025.

An additional $48.8 million is allocated from a 2017 settlement with German carmaker Volkswagen AG over its diesel emissions cheating scandal to fund electric school and transit buses, as well as charging stations.

New York’s announcement comes on the heels of a similar measure by Florida, which on July 10 announced an $8.6 million investment to expand charging stations.

While electric vehicle sales have gradually increased over the past few years, they still made up less than 2% of all U.S. vehicle sales in 2019, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.

Wider adoption has been stifled in part by a lack of reliable charging networks, with most of them concentrated in densely populated urban areas and along the U.S. East and West Coasts.

While many carmakers, including electric vehicle pioneer Tesla Inc, have significantly increased the range of vehicles on a single charge, many consumers are still put off by the higher sticker price and a lack of charging infrastructure, according to various surveys.

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U.S. Steps Up Crackdown On MS-13, Seeks Death Penalty Of Accused Leader On Long Island

A migrant from Central America, who border patrol agents suspected was a member of the gang Mara Salvatrucha (commonly known as MS-13), is handcuffed after being apprehended with a group of men who crossed into the United States from Mexico in La Joya, Texas, U.S., May 8, 2019. REUTERS/Adrees Latif

By Mark Hosenball

The U.S. Justice Department on Wednesday said it was stepping up a crackdown on the international criminal gang MS-13 and would seek the death penalty against an alleged New York gang leader facing murder charges.

The department also said it was bringing terrorism-related charges against a MS-13 member for the first time, as well as charges against alleged leaders of gang cells known as the “Hollywood Locos” and “Los Angeles Program.”

The Trump administration’s Justice Department has vowed to “go to war against MS-13,” also known as Mara Salvatrucha, which started in the 1980s as a Salvadoran street gang in Los Angeles.

The department said prosecutors moved to seek the death penalty against Alexi Saenz, who is accused of leading a branch of MS-13 on Long Island nicknamed “Blasty,” who is accused of committing seven murders between 2016 and 2017, including the killings of two high school students who were murdered with a machete and baseball bat.

Saenz’s alleged victims included two teenage girls in Brentwood. His lawyer, David Ruhnke, was not immediately available for comment.

In an indictment unsealed on Tuesday, federal prosecutors in Alexandria, Virginia, charged alleged MS-13 leader Armando Eliu Melgar Diaz with conspiring to provide material support to terrorists, as well as drug trafficking and racketeering.

The Justice Department said this was the first time an MS-13 member has been charged with terrorism-related offenses. Court records indicate a warrant was been issued for Diaz’ arrest in May.

In another indictment unsealed on Tuesday in Nevada, prosecutors said 13 MS-13 members were charged with various offenses, including operating a continuing criminal enterprise, narcotics distribution and weapons charges.

Trump has previously linked the fight against the gang with his campaign against illegal immigration. Critics of the administration’s tactics argue that the crackdown has also unlawfully detained immigrant teens accused of gang affiliation.

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