Lost Girls, a movie based on the nonfiction book of the same name chronicling the unsolved Long Island Serial Killer case, is set to be turned into a movie, Netflix announced Wednesday.

Actress Amy Ryan will play Mari Gilbert, the mother of Shannan Gilbert, the missing woman Suffolk County police were searching for when they uncovered 10 sets of human remains in and around Gilgo Beach on Ocean Parkway.

“The story, both a true crime story and a strong character piece, follows Mari Gilbert as she relentlessly drives law enforcement agents to search for her missing daughter and in the process sheds light on a wave of unsolved murders of young female sex workers on the South Shore barrier islands of Long Island,” Netflix said in the announcement.

The real-life Marie was murdered by Shannan’s sister, but a lawsuit seeking the release of 911 tapes Shannan made the night she went missing is still pending.

Director Liz Garbus, an Oscar-nominated documentarian, is making her narrative feature debut with the film. Producers Anne Carey and Kevin McCormick are collaborating on the project along with executive producers along with Amy Nauiokas, Rory Koslow.

Screenwriter Michael Werwie based the film on Robert Kolker’s book about the case, which is considered the largest unsolved homicide investigation in Suffolk history.

Ryan has previously starred in Gone Baby Gone. She will also appear in the upcoming Beautiful Boy and Late Night. Garbus is known for What Happened Miss Simone?

The film is expected to be a departure from A&E’s 2016 docu-series The Killing Season, by Joshua Zeman and Rachel Mills, that was the most recent major production on the case.

Netflix has not yet said when exactly Lost Girls was set to be released. Stay tuned.

Related Story: How Websleuths & Filmmakers Sparked A Revelation In Gilgo Beach Murders Case

Comments
Previous article3 Pets That Will Be Your Sunshine On A Rainy Day
Next articleLong Island Memorial Day Parades 2018
Timothy Bolger is the Editor in Chief of the Long Island Press who’s been working to uncover unreported stories since shortly after it launched in 2003. When he’s not editing, getting hassled by The Man or fielding cold calls to the newsroom, he covers crime, general interest and political news in addition to reporting longer, sometimes investigative features. He won’t be happy until everyone is as pissed off as he is about how screwed up Lawn Guyland is.