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Amelia Earhart Mystery Solved?

Amelia Earhart
(AP Photo)
Amelia Earhart
(AP Photo)

A new search is being conducted to try to find the body of aviatrix Amelia Earhart.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was “thrilled” when she met with a group of scientists who are launching a new investigation into the disappearance of Amelia Earhart 75 years ago. Earhart wanted to be the first woman to fly around the world but disappeared on July 2.

“Wow,” Clinton said in Washington, D.C., according to ABC News. “This an exciting day. We haven’t had an event quite like this one before and that’s what I love about it.”

The research is privately funded and is going to cost about a half-million dollars and the efforts to discover what happened to Earhart is expected to begin in July.

When the secretary began to speak, she talked about how Earhart was one of her heroes as a child. “Her legacy resonates today for anyone, boys and girls, who dream for the stars.” Clinton continued, “She embodied the spirit of an America coming of age. So here we are to mark a time that’s particularly rich in symbolism and opportunity, like Amelia Earhart.”

There’s a possibility that parts of Earnhart’s plane have been found, but an official said, “We’re not making any bets. It’s not what you find, but what you’re searching for.”

A group know as Tighar, or The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, will be participating in the search for Earhart and they will be predominately focusing on an island called Nikumaroro, which is in between Australia and Hawaii, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Nikumaroro was on Earnhart’s path as she flew from New Guinea to Howland Island and it is thought that she and navigator Fred Noonan could have possibly landed on that island. It is being assumed that they duo may have lived on the island for days or weeks.

In 2007 researches found a mirror from a woman’s compact, buttons and a zipper from a flight jacket during an expedition. The articles were all American-made, from the proper time period and a part of Earnhart’s inventory.

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