George Oliphant is the host of George to the Rescue. (Photos courtesy of NBC)

Three groups of Long Islanders got surprise renovations from benevolent home improvement contractors who donated their time, materials, and efforts in the latest season of NBC’s reality show George to the Rescue.

In season 11, which debuted last month, host George Oliphant’s transformations include a Merrick family’s bedroom and bathroom, the home office of a Floral Park-based nonprofit’s telecommuting program director, and Northwell Health’s North Shore University Hospital staff break room known as the Lavender Lounge in Manhasset.

“This was the most challenging and the most meaningful George to the Rescue season to date,“ said Marni Sabia, vice president of Lifestyle Production for LX.TV, which produces the show. “Our projects were completed during the COVID pandemic and required a different approach, including social distancing, the use of PPE and other steps to ensure the health and safety of each project team. Through it all, George never missed a beat.”

The home improvement series follows Oliphant and his team of contractors and designers taking on perplexing home improvement projects for families facing their own personal challenges within their homes or work spaces that they can’t address on their own. It has featured many Long Islanders over the years since the show launched in 2010.

In an episode that aired on Sept. 26, George completes a bedroom and bathroom makeover for a widow and her family, including a young son coping with the neurological condition AFM.

In an episode airing Oct. 10, George completes an office design and makeover for the members of the Hance Family Foundation, which teaches females of all ages how to think positively about their bodies, their skills, and their relationships. Long Island parents Jackie and Warren Hance founded the nonprofit after losing their three daughters in the 2009 wrong-way Taconic Parkway crash that left eight dead. Chastity Riese of Riese Design in Northport, Green Apple Painting in Planview, and Aboff’s Paints in Huntington came together to donate materials and labor for the project.

And in an episode airing Oct. 17, George renovates NSUH’s Lavender Lounge that offers relaxation, therapy, team building, and other stress-free activities to the hospital’s frontline workers during the coronavirus pandemic.

“We are so grateful to the team at George to the Rescue for recognizing the needs of our healthcare workforce and partnering with us to make this important space so warm and welcoming,” said Jon Sendach, executive director of NSUH. “We now have a fitting space to help our teams rejuvenate during their workday.”

George to the Rescue airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. on NBC.

Related Story: George To The Rescue Transforms Lindenhurst Warehouse Into Sensory Gym

Related Story: George To The Rescue Makes Home Accessible for Merrick Dad

Related Story: NBC’s George to the Rescue Helps Massapequa Mom

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Timothy Bolger is the Editor in Chief of the Long Island Press who’s been working to uncover unreported stories since shortly after it launched in 2003. When he’s not editing, getting hassled by The Man or fielding cold calls to the newsroom, he covers crime, general interest and political news in addition to reporting longer, sometimes investigative features. He won’t be happy until everyone is as pissed off as he is about how screwed up Lawn Guyland is.