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Groundhog Day 2012: Mixed Predictions

Michael Bloomberg
FILE – In this Monday, Feb. 2, 2009 photo supplied by the Mayor’s Office, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg holds the city’s prognosticating rodent, Charles G. Hogg, also known as Staten Island Chuck, at the Staten Island Zoo during Groudhog Day festivities in New York. The bit through Bloomberg’s glove and chomped on his left index finger when the mayor was trying to coax the animal into view with an ear of corn. (AP Photo/Office of the Mayor, Spencer T. Tucker)
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FILE - In this Monday, Feb. 2, 2009 photo supplied by the Mayor's Office, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg holds the city's prognosticating rodent, Charles G. Hogg, also known as Staten Island Chuck, at the Staten Island Zoo during Groudhog Day festivities in New York. The bit through Bloomberg's glove and chomped on his left index finger when the mayor was trying to coax the animal into view with an ear of corn. (AP Photo/Office of the Mayor, Spencer T. Tucker)

Groundhog Day kicked off February 2, with mixed “predictions” for the remainder of winter.

Optimistic groundhogs included New York’s Staten Island Chuck, who “predicted” an early spring Thursday morning.

Chuck, whose real name is Charles G. Hogg, made his “prediction” at the Staten Island Zoo with Mayor Michael Bloomberg on hand to celebrate the holiday with the famous groundhog.

Woody the Woodchuck in Michigan agreed with Chuck, it will be an early spring–she didn’t see her shadow either.

Adding to the list, Jimmy the Groundhog didn’t see his shadow in Wisconsin and Holtsville Hal of Long Island missed his shadow too.

Another early spring-predicting groundhog was Georgia’s Gen. Beauregard Lee, who missed his shadow as well. The groundhog was probably distracted by the hundreds of spectators reportedly looking on and cheering at as early as 7:30 a.m.

According to the Associated Press, Beau’s got a 94 percent accuracy rating beating possibly the most famous groundhog, and one of the most trusted of them all, Pennsylvania’s Punxsutawney Phil.

That’s good news for spring lovers, since Phil emerged from his hole and caught a glimpse of his shadow, “predicting” six more weeks of winter.

According to CBS, the groundhog made his “prediction” on Gobbler’s Knob, a hill in the town of Punxsutawney with spectators including Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett looking on.

Malverne Mel of Long Island reportedly also saw his shadow.

The holiday, according to the Associated Press, stems from a German superstition that says if a hibernating animal casts a shadow on Feb. 2, Christian holiday of Candlemas, winter will last another six weeks. Legend says spring will come early.

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