Amanda De Lauzon

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3 New Restaurants To Try on Long Island

Gerardi’s Bar and Grill has some fresh takes on wings.

IT BGL

Two Long Island classics come together at a new brick oven eatery in Oyster Bay, hoping to redefine fast-casual dining as what the owners call fine counter dining. 

Offering bagels and pizza, this new restaurant opened by Brad and Michele Berrol hopes to make customer service a priority, with fresh ingredients, easy ordering and a higher-class fast dining experience. They will offer classic pizzas and signature creations along with egg sandwiches, salads, lunch items and desserts. 

The eatery is open at 6 a.m. daily. It closes at 4 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, 9 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday, and 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. It hopes to serve dinner soon as well as online ordering for pickup and delivery.

19 East Main Street, Oyster Bay. itbgl.com

GERARDI’S BAR AND GRILL 

Offering a wide range of American favorites, this new addition has a big menu of options for lunch, dinner, tapas, desserts, and starters. 

Whether you’re lunching outside on the patio or enjoying the intimate dining room for dinner, Gerardi’s offers an expansive menu of options along with signature drinks and cocktails. 

Gerardi’s also features specials like happy hour pricing from 4 p.m. to 7 pm Monday through Friday; Taco Tuesdays, which comes with $2 tacos all day; and Wine Wednesdays, where all bottled wines are 50 percent off.

160 Adams Avenue, Hauppauge, gerardisgrill.com

SWEETWATERS COFFEE AND TEA 

Indulge your sweet tooth with Sweetwater’s many options for breakfast and midday pick-me-ups.

Taste signature coffees and teas along with classic dessert and snack options. If you want something more refreshing, cool down with one of the blended frozen drinks, called ice dragons. Sweetwaters offers unique café items inspired by Asian influences, like coffee called the dragon eye, made by blending their house coffee with sweetened condensed milk. 

Owners Lou and Chris hope to also use the café as a place to host nonprofit events as well as work by local artists.

200 W. Main St., Smithtown, sweetwaterscafe.com

Apple Picking on Long Island 2019: Where To Pick Your Apples

Gardener hand picking green apple.

Fort Salonga Farm
The dwarf trees at Salonga Farm make it the perfect place for children to easily pick apples. For something sweeter, check out their honey for sale, extracted from local beehives. Monday-Friday: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. through October. 30 Meadow Glen Rd., Northport. 631-269-9666, fortsalongafarm.com

Hank’s Pumpkintown
At $25 to pick a 1-peck bag, choose from 14 different kinds of apples that will be good for pies, applesauce, or just as a snack. 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Sept. 7 through late October. 240 Montauk Hwy., Watermill. 631-726-4667, hankspumpkintown.com

Harbes Family Farm and Orchard
Enjoy a 15-acre apple orchard as well as the annual apple festival which includes apple cider donut-eating contests, apple games, hayrides, and live entertainment. Opening August 31 and running 9 a.m.-6 p.m. every weekend Sept.-Oct. Apple Festival is Sept. 14, 15. 5698 Sound Ave., Riverhead. 631-369-1111, harbesfamilyfarm.com

Hayden’s Peach Orchard
At $2 a pound you can pick a variety of apples including Cortland, Fuji, and Gala. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily through October. 561 Hulse Landing County Rd. 54, Wading River, 631-929-1115, davis-peach-farm.business.site

Lewin Farms
Pick a variety of seasonal apples while shopping for other fresh Long Island produce and honey. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. daily. late August through October. 812 Sound Ave., Calverton, 631-929-4327, lewinfarm.com

Milk Pail U-Pick Farm
Throughout September and October enjoy more than 20 different kinds of apples for $49 for a bag and $12 for a smaller bag. Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Friday, Saturday, Sunday 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Apple picking starts Sept. 1 through late October. 1346 Montauk Hwy., Watermill, milk-pail.com

Seven Ponds Orchard
This orchard has many kinds to choose from including some that are great for baking, like Golden Delicious, Red Delicious, and Honey Crisp. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. daily through Thanksgiving. 65 Seven Ponds Rd., Watermill, 631-726-8015, facebook.com/Seven-Ponds-Orchard

Wickham’s Fruit Farm
At one of the largest farms on the North Fork dating back to 1661, choose from a wide range of apples, cider donuts, and apple cider from the oldest cider press on Long Island. 9 a.m.- 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. September through October. 28700 Main Rd., Cutchogue, 631-734-6441, wickhamsfruitfarm.com

Windy Acres Farm
Enjoy a variety of more than 30 different kinds of apples while relaxing in the farm’s picnic areas and snacking on a candy apple or other in house-made goodies. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. 3810 Middle Country Rd., Calverton, 631-727-4554, facebook.com/Windy-Acres-Farm

Woodside Orchards
Parents will love Woodside Orchard’s hard cider tastings followed by picking a variety of different apples including Arkansas Black, Baldwin, and Cortland. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily at Aquebogue location; same time on Saturday and Sunday at Jamesport location. 729 Main Rd., Aquebogue and 116 Manor Lane, Jamesport. 631-722-5770, woodsideorchards.com

15 Mascots That Rally Long Island College Spirit

Bears

Courtesy of NYIT

Best known for their lacrosse team, Old Westbury-based New York Institute of Technology‘s mascot has had an exciting update this year with a new logo featuring revamped school colors of dark blue and gold.

Bobcats

Courtesy of NYU

As New York University’s school color is violet, the original mascot was a student dressed as a violet flower. Now the school’s teams are represented by the bobcat, which stands for
the Bobst Library, mixing the athletic performance and academic excellence NYU represents, including at the NYU Long Island School of Medicine in Mineola.

Sound

Courtesy of Five Towns College

With the reboot of Five Towns College‘s men’s and women’s basketball teams, the Sound, and its new mascot, Fader the bird, has brought excitement to pep rallies and games at the Dix Hills campus.

Sharks

Courtesy of Suffolk County Community College

Fineas, also known as Finn, is a little fish in a big pond at Suffolk County Community College, the largest community college in the State University of New York system. Fineas supports the students on their two-year journey and cheers them on in their long list of clubs and sports teams, the Sharks.

Golden Eagles

Courtesy of St. Joseph’s College

Flying high, this mascot represents St. Joseph’s College in Patchogue and its motto “to be, not to seem,” in support of more than 18 teams.

Johnny Thunderbird

Courtesy of St. John’s University

Voted on by St. John’s University students in 2009, this bird got his name from the nickname given to St. John’s students, “Johnnies,” including those at the Long Island Graduate Center in Hauppauge.

Pride

Courtesy of Hofstra University

Representing Hofstra University Pride in Hempstead are two mascots, Kate and Willie, a lion and lioness named after the University’s benefactors, William Hofstra and his wife, Kate Davidson. It is one of the few universities to have more than one mascot to represent their 21 intercollegiate teams competing at the NCAA Division I level. Double the mascot, double the school pride!

Lions

Courtesy of Nassau Community College

With more than 20 men’s and women’s athletic teams, Garden City-based Nassau Community College’s Leo the lion has his work cut out for him cheering alongside football and basketball games.

Panthers

Courtesy of SUNY College at Old Westbury

Introduced in 2008 with panther pride week, SUNY College at Old Westbury‘s mascot’s name, Owwin, is a mix of the school name (“OW”) and WIN, showing their pride in the school’s 13 different Division III athletic teams.

Panthers

Courtesy of Adelphi University

First used in an Adelphi University men’s basketball game in 1947, this mascot was created by a freshman at the time and now continues to be used to support the many teams of the Garden City campus, including their current basketball team.

Rams

Courtesy of Farmingdale State College

Since the 1940s the ram has been used as a sign of power, drive, and fearlessness
for Farmingdale State College. Back then it was even represented by a live ram instead of
by today’s student dressed up as the character, dubbed Ram-Bo.

Mariners

Courtesy of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy

High and mighty, Salty the Sea Eagle, often mistakenly referred to as a seagull, represents the Mariners, as the prestigious athletics and academics of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point are known.

Sharks

LIU Post in Brookville has found a new mascot after the long reign of the pioneer. Beginning this September, teams will embody the strength and brilliance of a shark.

Lions

Courtesy of Molloy College

Roaring with excitement, Victor E. Lion is the mascot featured on the Molloy College emblem. He’s a fan favorite as he dances alongside the cheerleaders at the many basketball games in Rockville Centre.

Seawolves

Courtesy of Stony Brook University

This mythical sea creature greets everyone with a high five and has been a part
of the Stony Brook University athletic department since 1995. Wolfie the Seawolf’s’s name was carefully selected from a list of more than 200 possible names by a committee made up of students, alumni, faculty, and administrators.

Gavin DeGraw Surprises Fans With Performance at NYCBS Cancer Center Grand Opening

Gavin DeGraw performed at the grand opening of the New York Cancer and Blood Specialists new facility in Port Jefferson Station on Monday, Aug. 5, 2019. (Long Island Press photo)

Grammy-winning rocker Gavin DeGraw played a surprise show Monday at a ribbon-cutting ceremony marking the grand opening of the New York Cancer and Blood Specialists new facility in Port Jefferson Station.

DeGraw, who won a Grammy for his duet with Colbie Caillat on the song “We Both Know,” expressed his excitement for the new building, which makes more accessible to Long Islanders a wide range of cutting edge treatment techniques in oncology, radiation therapy, clinical trials, and personalized medicine.

“I’m excited to be here with all of you for the opening of this great building,” DeGraw told the crowd of fans surprised by the impromptu performance. “I hope to see it do great things and help so many people.”

With physicians on call for 24 hours a day and services 365 days a year, the new center has already started treating patients in their fight against cancer as well as running research clinical trials and offering second opinions to those looking for newer advances in their treatment. 

“It’s an unbelievable honor and a privilege every day to be allowed to care for these heroes that we have and see every day, that come walking into our offices,” said Dr. Jeff Vacirca, CEO and managing partner of New York Cancer & Blood Specialists. “Without the help of some really remarkable individuals we couldn’t have done such a remarkable thing and made a project like this happen. We have made a facility with great exposure to our community, with the availability of imaging, of pharmacy, of chemotherapy, of research right around the corner from all of our patients, where they can walk 20 feet and see their doctors.”

The opening was joined by multiple local officials who helped make the building come a reality. Brookhaven Councilmen Neil Foley and Kevin LaValle along with Councilwomen Jane Bonner and Valerie Cartright joined Brookhaven Town Supervisor Ed Romaine as he cut the ribbon officially opening the building to the public.

“This center is saving lives of our friends, our neighbors, and our family,” said Romaine. “So many people will use this facility in the next few years and they will walk out hopefully in remission, cured, and living a much healthier life than they were when they walked in. This is a center that is so important. 

“So many people, some of our close friends, owe their life to this institution,” he continued. “There are so many people who need healing. They can come here and get back on the road to recovery.” 

For more info visit nycancer.com

L. to R.: Valerie Cartright, Jane Bonner, Ed Romaine, and Kevin LaValle. (Long Island Press photo)

17 Viral Videos That Made Long Island Internet Famous

17. Ronkokamo


“We’ll take the train because the expressways slow, that’s where we want to go, down to Ronkokamo,” sang comedian and actor Brian Roach in his Beach Boys parody music video about his hometown, Ronkonkoma. This YouTube video has more than 118,200 views since 2017. 

16. LIRR Racist

 

This Long Island Rail Road rider’s racist rant directed at an African American woman on the train went viral on Facebook in May and now has more than 138,000 views. The rider, later identified as Edward Ruggiero of Long Beach, pleaded guilty harassment and disorderly conduct in July.

15. Tears ‘R Us

 

“I will cherish my time here for life,” said Ryan Thomas under his viral Facebook video of the last sign off at Toys ‘R Us in Lake Grove. With stores around the country closing, this employee took to Facebook to show his appreciation of his time working for the company and the video has over 158,000 views since it was posted last year.

14. The Piano Train

In May 2018, Long Island Rail Road riders broke out into song with the Billy Joel classic, Piano Man. This tweet has gained over 172,000 views since then and in the words of the twitter user who posted the original video, “This is what society should be like… peaceful, united and happy.” 

13. Massapequ-what?

Try not to cringe while watching southerners attempt to pronounce Long Island town names. This girl’s video tweeted in October 2016 now has more than 200,000 views and has inspired others to try to get their out-of-town friends to do the same. 

12. East End Postal

 

Handle with care is not the motto for the Hampton Bays Post office as a worker is seen throwing boxes without care into a truck. Many were angered over the treatment of their packages after a man posted the video to Facebook and more than 306,000 people viewed it since 2018.

11. Say What?

 

In his parody of the many different people who live on in the area, comedian Thomas Dale pokes fun at what he believes the lingo of a Long Islander sounds like. This YouTube video posted in 2012 and has more than 714,000 views. 

10. Can You Hear Me Now?

A Seaford man reached viral in 2015 when a cell phone video caught him in the act of brazenly climbing onto a Broadway stage to charge his dying iPhone in 2015. Nick Silvestri, 19, and his family were taking in Broadway’s “Hand of God” on July 2 when he crawled onto the set during the show and plugged his power-starved iPhone into an outlet that turned out to be fake. The video has been viewed more than 800,000 times.

9. Suffolk’s Anthem

 

Remember when everyone was making parody music videos about their hometown set to the tune of Jay Z’s New York State of Mind? Suffolk’s contribution to that viral trend got 923,932 views since being posted in September 2010.

8. Nassau State of Mind

 

Whether it’s because it’s a better parody of the above or that it was the first one out of the gate on Long Island in August 2010, Nassau State of Mind has more than 1.5 million views.

7. Super Dog

 

This dog plays hero to a drowning deer in the Long Island Sound and becomes viral star in the media with more than 1.6 million videos since this YouTube video exploded in July of 2017.

6. Piano Pup

 

A Long Island beagle named Buddy Mercury went viral for howling and playing the piano on YouTube, Instagram, and Facebook. His first video posted in February 2017 has more than 1.7 million views now and the dogs channel has over 52,300 subscribers.

5. Road Rage Racist

This driver in Deer Park is the definition of road rage. His discriminatory and racist comments did not go unnoticed by the Facebook user who posted it in July of 2018 with more than 2 million views.

4. Vegas Takedown

 

UFC fighter and East Meadow native Matt Serra gained more than 2.7 million views for holding down a reckless drunk man who was yelling at waiters in a Las Vegas restaurant.

3. Haunted Hillary House

Video of a bizarre Hillary Clinton-themed “haunted house” in Bellmore went viral during the 2016 presidential campaign, although viewers’ reactions depended upon whether they backed the Democratic presidential nominee or her Republican rival, Donald Trump. The video has gotten more than 3 million views in three years.

2. Trump Train Man

Long Island Rail Road worker Thomas Mundy looks presidential with his best Donald Trump impression and even bares a very identical resemblance as well. This video posted in April this year has more than 4.3 million views.

  1. Bagel Man

Five-foot-tall and full of anger this furious Long Islander takes first place with 26 million views so far this month on the original tweet. Fourty-five-year-old Chris Morgan of Bay Shore became internet famous after his angry rant about women judging him for his height while standing in a Bagel Boss. He’s slated to fight other viral video stars this fall.

That’s A Wrap for This Year’s Long Island International Film Expo

Elias Plagianos and Jackie Martling

Artists, actors, and filmmakers came together to celebrate and support up-and-comers in the industry this past week at the 22nd Annual Long Island International Film Expo (LIIFE) at the historic Bellmore Movies.

Approximately 400 films were entered and around only 180 were hand chosen to be screened. These incoming filmmakers as well as the seasoned returning attendees were offered a variety of panels, screenings and networking opportunities to help them break into the film world. 

“There are so many people who are part of this community that have helped me become who I am as a filmmaker,” said 10-year expo attendee and past winner Elias Plagianos. “You find your group and you grow with them, as I have grown as a person so has this community and festival.”

The closing ceremony was opened by singer/songwriter Sammie Rae and Reggaetón artist Los Vegas. The ceremony was joined by celebrities including the host Kevin Brown, the stand-up comedian and actor featured in the hit TV show 30 Rock for seven seasons as well as in many other films.

“We try to be a film festival that’s really very laser focused on the filmmakers,” said Debra Markowitz, director of the Nassau County Film Commission and cofounder of LIIFE. “We want them to really get to know the industry.”

Many different awards were given out such as best director, best story, best feature film, best short film, best Long Island Film, best student film, best animation, best foreign film, best web series as well as technical categories such as best cinematography, best art direction, and best lighting. 

“It meant the world to us to sit in our home town in this theatre and feel the room around us while people reacted to our film,” said the 2019 LIIFE Award for Best Feature Film, Kenneth Frank for his film Family Obligations. “As all filmmakers know, it takes an army to do what we do.”

The expo caters to a wide range of film lovers and even has a Young Filmmakers Showcase with the youngest participant this year being only 15 years old. The winner of this showcase was LIU Post student Justin Portaro for his film Kid The Moon. 

The LIIFEtime Career Achievement Honoree was John Gallagher who has spent 40 years as a director, writer producer and educator for the film industry. Writer of the cult comedy The Deli and many others he has inspired newcomers in the field to continue to create no matter the circumstances. After being in a life altering fire that put him in a wheel chair he came back to what he loves and has made eight movies since.

“I was told I had a 10 percent chance of survival and that I wasn’t able to work anymore, a month later I got out of the hospital and I directed a feature film,” said Gallagher. “When someone says you can’t do something, you do it anyways.” 

The festival returns every year in July and offers a tight networking community to emerging filmmakers. For more info visit longislandfilm.com.

New Dinosaur Exhibit Debuts at The Center for Science, Teaching and Learning in Rockville Centre

Dinosaurs! and People’s United Bank Animal Adventure, will officially open to the public on July 15 at The Center for Science, Teaching & Learning in Rockville Centre. (Courtesy CSTL Photographer: David Conn)

A much-anticipated new attraction called Dinosaurs! And Peoples United Bank Animal Adventure debuts Monday at the Center for Science, Teaching and Learning (CSTL) located in the Tanglewood Preserve in Rockville Centre.

The exhibit in CSTL’s new 3,500-square-foot WAC Lighting Hall features 20-foot-tall model dinosaurs, 17-foot-tall animatronic dinosaurs, and live animals such as emu, owls, goats, alligators, and lizards with 90 percent of these animals being rescued or permanently disabled.

“We want kids to think science is cool again,” CSTL Executive Director Ray Ann Havasy told reporters Wednesday during a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new exhibit. “I feel like we have done a good job when visitors leave wanting to know even more.”

The exhibit, which is expected to attract 150,000 visitors annually, boasts family-friendly, interactive exhibits so that children can have fun while learning.

“I want kids to learn how animals have evolved to what they are today,” said paleontologist Ryan Ridder, who helped set up the attraction and create the interactive parts of the exhibits.

The attraction will also teach kids about the animals while also giving the rescues a home.

“We want to teach people about how animals cohabit wildlife with us, especially on a place like Long Island and using animals who need a home was a great way of doing this,” said Havasy.

A PSEG sponsorship ensured that the building is the only exhibit in New York State heated and cooled by geothermal energy.

“As our kids are getting more and more into the digital world it’s important to go out, get dirty, and discover the natural world,” said Nassau County Executive Laura Curran.

CSTL’s Tanglewood Preserve headquarters is located at 1450 Tanglewood Rd., in Rockville Centre. It’s open daily 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets will be $15 for adults and $12 for children. Kids under 1 are free. For more information, visit cstl.org

Long Island Ice Cream Tour Hits The Road For Sweet Frozen Treats

Indulging in scoops, sundaes, and cones aplenty will be participants of the annual Long Island Ice Cream Tour (LIICT) taking place on Saturday. 

The tour invites lovers of the chilled treat to discover hidden gem ice cream parlors across LI, learn how homemade ice cream is made, and enjoy endless frozen desserts along with vegan options at some locations.

“This is a must-do event for Long Islanders because it supports local businesses while getting to tour unique parts of the Island and enjoy a beautiful summer day,” said Jeff Noreman, LIICT co-founder. “It’s ice cream. What could ever not be great about ice cream?”

Born in 2011, the tour blended Noreman’s knowledge and love for homemade ice cream with cofounder Derek Steen’s sense of adventure to create the tour across the Island.

The annual tour begins at 9 a.m. on July 13 and travels to nine different locally owned ice cream parlors across Suffolk and Nassau counties. 

It starts at International Delight Café in Rockville Centre, where participants can buy ice cream along with breakfast to kick off the day. The tour will then proceed to travel down Long Island and stop at many shops along the way and even the beach for a quick photo. The tour ends at Snowflake Ice Cream Shoppe in Riverhead, where participants will see a behind-the-scenes demo of ice cream being made.

So what makes this homemade ice cream better?

“When you have regular ice cream it’s created, frozen, then transported from place to place,” said Noreman. “It melts a little during this process, when they refreeze it, sometimes it crystalizes and it ends up being not as smooth and creamy. You get more flavor and it’s a much smoother ice cream when its homemade.”

Tickets cost $20.70 and registration is open on liict.org. Special deals will be available on the tour for registered participants but only if they wear the color of the year, which is yellow.

Long Island Free Outdoor Movie Nights Summer 2019

The Avengers
Jones Beach Bandshell, Field 4, Wantagh. Starts at sunset. Thursday, June 27.

Black Panther
Sunset Park, Port Washington. 8:30 p.m. Saturday, June 29. 

Jaws
Grand Beach, Long Beach. Saturday, June 29.

Wonder
Town Hall Park, Babylon. At sunset. Monday, July 1.

Kung Fu Panda
Casamento Park, 101 Muncey Rd., Bay Shore. Sunset, Monday, July 1.

Star Wars IV – A New Hope 
Southampton Arts Center, 25 Jobs Lane, Southampton. 8:30 p.m. Friday, July 5.

A Dog’s Way Home
Crab Meadow Beach Drive-In, Waterside Ave., Northport. Starts at dusk. Monday, July 8.

Incredibles
Hidden Pond Park, 660 Terry Rd., Hauppauge. Sunset, Monday, July 8.

Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax
Village Green, 361 Main Street, Farmingdale. Starts at dusk. Tuesday, July 9.

Hotel Transylvania 
Cedar Creek Park, 3340 Merrick Road, Seaford. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday July 9.

Mary Poppins Returns
Plainview-Old Bethpage Community Park, Plainview. 8 p.m. Thursday, July 11.

Christopher Robin
Jones Beach Bandshell, Field 4, Wantagh. Starts at sunset. Thursday July 11.

Hotel Transylvania 3
Harry Chapin Lakeside Theatre, Eisenhower Park, East Meadow. Sunset, Thursday, July 11.

Finding Nemo
Southampton Arts Center, 25 Jobs Lane, Southampton. 8:30 p.m. Friday, July 12.

Finding Nemo 
The East Terrace, 880 Lido Blvd, Lido Beach. 8:30 p.m. Friday, July 12.

The Incredibles 2
Heritage Park, 633 Mount Sinai-Coram Rd, Mt Sinai. 8:15 p.m. Friday July 12.

Won’t You Be My Neighbor
Sunset Park, Port Washington. 8:30 p.m. Saturday, July 13.

The Goonies
Lafayette Beach, Long Beach. Sunset, Saturday, July 13.

Casper 
Tanner Park, Babylon. At sunset. Monday, July 15.

The Greatest Showman
Islip Grange Park, 10 Broadway, Sayville. Sunset, Monday, July 15


Spiderman: Into the Spider-Verse
Village Green, 361 Main Street, Farmingdale. Starts at dusk. Tuesday, July 16.

A Bugs Life
North Woodmere Park, Hungry Harbor Road, Valley Stream. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 16.

Back to the Future
Allen Town Park, Farmingdale. 8 p.m. Thursday, July 18.

The Grinch
Jones Beach Bandshell, Field 4, Wantagh. Starts at sunset. Thursday July 18.

Goosebumps 2
Harry Chapin Lakeside Theatre, Eisenhower Park, East Meadow. Sunset, Thursday, July 18.

Singin’ in the Rain
Southampton Arts Center, 25 Jobs Lane, Southampton. 8:30 p.m. Friday, July 19.

Small Foot
South Bay Bible Church at 578 Montauk Highway, East Moriches. 8 p.m. Friday, July 19.

Singin’ in the Rain
Southampton Arts Center, 25 Jobs Lane, Southampton. 8:30 p.m. Friday, July 19.

How to Train Your Dragon 
The West Terrace, 880 Lido Blvd, Lido Beach. 8:30 p.m. Sunday, July 21.

Jurassic Park
The Great Lawn, Main St., Westhampton Beach. 7:30 p.m. Monday, July 22.

Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation
Crab meadow Beach drive-In, Waterside Ave., Northport. Starts at dusk. Monday, July 22.

Fred Claus
Holbrook Country Club, 700 Patchogue-Holbrook Rd., Holbrook. Sunset, Monday, July 22.

Small Foot
Village Green, 361 Main Street, Farmingdale. Starts at dusk. Tuesday, July 23.

How to Train Your Dragon 2
Cedar Creek Park, 3340 Merrick Road, Seaford. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday July 23.

Incredibles 2
Syosset-Woodbury Community Park, Woodbury. 8 p.m. Thursday, July 25.

Aquaman
Jones Beach Bandshell, Field 4, Wantagh. Starts at sunset. Thursday July 25.

How To Train Your Dragon: Hidden World
Harry Chapin Lakeside Theatre, Eisenhower Park, East Meadow. Sunset, Thursday, July 25.

The Incredibles 
Nickerson Beach, West Terrace, 880 Lido Blvd, Lido Beach. 8:30 p.m. Friday, July 26.

Get Out 
Southampton Arts Center, 25 Jobs Lane, Southampton. 8:30 p.m. Friday, July 27.

The Greatest Showman
Riverside Beach, Long Beach. Sunset, Friday, July 27.

Incredibles 2
Tanner Park, Babylon. At sunset. Monday, July 29.

Night at The Museum
Brookwood Hall, 50 Irish Lane, East Islip. Sunset, Monday, July 29.

A Dog’s Way Home
Village Green, 361 Main Street, Farmingdale. Starts at dusk. Tuesday, July 30.

Megamind
North Woodmere Park, Hungry Harbor Road, Valley Stream. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 30.

Beauty & The Beast
Marjorie Post Park, Massapequa. 8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 1.

Bumblebee
Jones Beach Bandshell, Field 4, Wantagh. Starts at sunset. Thursday Aug. 1.

Instant Family
Harry Chapin Lakeside Theatre, Eisenhower Park, East Meadow. Sunset, Thursday, Aug 1.

Spider Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Southampton Arts Center, 25 Jobs Lane, Southampton. 8:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 2.

Ghostbusters
Sunset Park, Port Washington. 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 3.

Madagascar
Nickerson Beach, West Terrace, Nickerson Beach, 880 Lido Blvd, Lido Beach. 8:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 4.

Pete’s Dragon
Tanner park, Babylon. At sunset. Monday, Aug. 5.

Incredibles 2
Heckscher Park, Main street and prime Ave., Huntington. Starts at dusk. Monday, Aug. 5.

A Bug’s Life
Broadway Avenue Park, Sayville. Sunset, Monday Aug. 5.

Ralph Breaks the Internet
Village Green, 361 Main Street, Farmingdale. Starts at dusk. Tuesday, Aug. 6.

Parent Trap
Cedar Creek Park, 3340 Merrick Road, Seaford. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday Aug. 6.

Ralph Breaks the Internet
Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park and Beach, Oyster Bay. 8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 8.

Incredibles 2
Jones Beach Bandshell, Field 4, Wantagh. Starts at sunset. Thursday Aug. 8.

The Lego Movie 2
Harry Chapin Lakeside Theatre, Eisenhower Park, East Meadow. Sunset, Thursday, Aug 8.

Crazy Rich Asians
Southampton Arts Center, 25 Jobs Lane, Southampton. 8:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 9.

How to Train Your Dragon 3
Heritage Park, 633 Mount Sinai-Coram Rd, Mt Sinai. 8:15 p.m. Friday, Aug. 9.

The Goonies
Nickerson Beach, East Terrace, 880 Lido Blvd., Lido Beach. Sunset, Friday, Aug. 9.

Rocky Horror Picture Show
Grand Beach, Long Beach. Sunet, Saturday, Aug. 10.

Finding Nemo
Nickerson Beach, East Terrace, 880 Lido Blvd., Lido Beach. Sunset, Friday, July 12.

Monster Trucks
Roberto Clemente Park, Brentwood. Sunset, Aug. 12.

Incredibles 2
Village Green, 361 Main Street, Farmingdale. Starts at dusk. Tuesday, Aug. 13.

School of Rock
North Woodmere Park, Hungry Harbor Road, Valley Stream. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 13.

Mary Poppins Returns
Jones Beach Bandshell, Field 4, Wantagh. Starts at sunset. Thursday Aug. 15.

Small Foot
Harry Chapin Lakeside Theatre, Eisenhower Park, East Meadow. Sunset, Thursday, Aug 15.

Ralph Breaks the Internet
South Bay Bible Church at 578 Montauk Highway, East Moriches. 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 16.

Black Panther
Southampton Arts Center, 25 Jobs Lane, Southampton. 8:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 16.

The Sandlot
Nickerson Beach, East Terrace, 880 Lido Blvd, Lido Beach. 8:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 18.

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Peter A. Nelson Park, Oakwood Rd., Huntington Station. Starts at dusk. Monday, Aug. 19.

Bedtime Stories
Eastview Fields, Central Islip. Sunset, Aug. 19.

The Goonies
Village Green, 361 Main Street, Farmingdale. Starts at dusk. Tuesday, Aug. 20.

Lego Movie 2
Jones Beach Bandshell, Field 4, Wantagh. Starts at sunset. Thursday Aug. 22.

The Kid Who Would Be King
Harry Chapin Lakeside Theatre, Eisenhower Park, East Meadow. Sunset, Thursday, Aug 22.

Bohemian Rhapsody
Southampton Arts Center, 25 Jobs Lane, Southampton. 8:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 23.

Mary Poppins Returns
Sunset Park, Port Washington. 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 24. 

Ralph Breaks The Internet
Lincoln Beach, Long Beach. Sunset, Saturday, Aug. 24.

School of Rock
Brookwood Hall, 50 Irish Lane, East Islip. Sunset, Monday, Aug. 26.

Captain Marvel
Jones Beach Bandshell, Field 4, Wantagh. Starts at sunset. Thursday Aug. 29.

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindlewald
Harry Chapin Lakeside Theatre, Eisenhower Park, East Meadow. Sunset, Thursday, Aug 29.

Jaws
Southampton Arts Center, 25 Jobs Lane, Southampton. 8:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 30

Mary Poppins Returns
South Bay Bible Church at 578 Montauk Highway, East Moriches. 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 20.

 

Purple Heart Recipient Wins Free House in Mastic

Kevin Palacios, center, is a veteran of the war in Afghanistan. (Long Island Press photo)

Tears streamed down the face of Kevin Palacios, a purple heart recipient and veteran of the war in Afghanistan, as it was announced that he was the new owner of a fully furnished mortgage-free home on Long Island.

After finding out he was a finalist in the Fairway Independent Mortgage Corporation’s Purple Hearts Campaign Contest, Hauppauge manager Steve Probst announced that Palacios was the winner and introduced him to his new home in Mastic.

“I can tell you this man is deserving, and I knew it the first minute I met him,” Probst told the crowd at Brookhaven Town Hall on Tuesday.

After being wounded during two tours in Afghanistan, he came back to civilian life got a degree at Farmingdale State College. He now works with fellow veterans at a job he describes as lovable.

“When you get out of the military nobody really teaches you how to come back to this world,” said Palacios. “It’s a place that I once knew and once called home.”

To help injured veterans assimilate back into civilian life, the foundation decided they wanted to give away a house mortgage free and fully furnished. With the help of the Long Island Board of Realtors, the Interior Design Society’s Long Island Chapter, and many local businesses this three bedroom home was fully decorated, renovated and furnished for the family. 

“I’ve gone and seen a whole different side of the word and it made me mature at a different level,” said Palacios. “While it was sometimes a struggle to adapt to this life, I was lucky to graduate and get a job with people I consider family.” 

For veterans, it can be hard to ease back into civilian life, with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), injuries, and other issues they face from their experience serving on the front lines. 

“You have to get right back into it or you’re going to lose yourself,” said Palacios. 

Finishing college, getting a job, and figuring out the future are all part of this new life these veterans have to adapt to.  

“These young veterans come into my office with their eligibility certificate and say they want to go to college but, they have a lot of fear in their eyes,” said Eric Farina, director of veteran affairs at Farmingdale State College. “They have been trained to face fear and roadside bombs, all the brave things that come with military service in a combat zone but they were not prepped to go sit in an English 101 class with kids that are five years younger than them.”

Long Island has the highest concentration of veterans in New York State and the second largest in the nation. This is just a start for how they can be paid back for the selfless service they gave. 

This foundation is planning to work continuously hard to help other veterans receive the help they need through their Purple Hearts Campaign.

“You deserve this,” Probst told Palacios as he held back tears.