Vigil at the University of Stony Brook commemorated the 10th anniversary of the death of the Ecuadorian immigrant Marcelo Lucero.

Ten years after a group of white teenagers killed Ecuadorian immigrant Marcelo Lucero in Patchogue, his family held an educational vigil at Stony Brook University.

The free event called “Our city: 10 years later” was full of memories, emotions and speeches from the victim’s brother, Joselo Lucero, Patchogue-Medford Schools Superintendent Dr. Michael Hynes, and filmmaker Susan Hagedorn.

“I thank everyone for being here, for accompanying me and my family in what has been a hard and painful process,” said Joselo Lucero. “It is a night dedicated to reflection on hate attacks whose aim is to avoid crimes by avoiding racial clashes towards the immigrant population.”

During the vigil, organizers screened an edited version of the documentary Deputized, which tells the story of the attack on Marcelo that occurred in 2008, when he was walking near the Long Island Rail Road station in Patchogue.

In the tragic night in which the events took place, the group of teens involved sought out the Latinos to attack, a cruel game that unleashed a tragedy for the Lucero family.

Assistants and moderators in Stony Brook remembered Marcelo as a man of integrity, family and with many dreams. They also called for tolerance and unity on Long Island, while sharing concern about the Trump administration.

“The hatred in the streets towards the community is increasing and it seems that no one notices it,” said Angela Robles, an Ecuadorian immigrant at the vigil. “I am afraid for my children.”

For his part, Adrian Angulo, a student who attended the meeting commented, “I believe that more cultural, moral and ethical education is needed in all racial ethnic groups.”

In turn, Josefina Cardenas, another of the attendees said, “This space is good to draw attention because the current government instigates more hate crimes.”

This story first appeared in Notica Long Island.

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