Quantcast

Long Island Press

2092 POSTS 0 COMMENTS
The Long Island Press

OpEd: Where is Vaccine For Assisted Living Staff And Residents?

vaccine for assisted living
Getty Images

By Lisa Newcomb, Executive Director, Empire State Association of Assisted Living

From the earliest days of planning for the development and distribution of an efficacious COVID-19 vaccination, those working in our nation’s congregate care settings for seniors, including assisted living communities, were prioritized as first in line to be vaccinated, and rightfully so: the population they serve has been universally identified as among the most vulnerable.

In the first months of the pandemic, a common criticism was that there was not enough attention or resources given to long term care settings, including assisted living, and there was outsized attention paid to hospitals. Whether it be PPE, staffing or financial assistance, the hospitals were always first in line. Perhaps, to some extent, that was appropriate, but not to the detriment of other vulnerable sectors. That should have been a valuable lesson learned as adult care facilities/assisted living residences continue to suffer from a lack of resources and a potentially high incidence of COVID among the frailest of our seniors.

That’s why we are baffled that now, weeks into the vaccination process, not one assisted living staff person or resident has received the vaccine. Yes, we understand that there is limited supply, and the decision has been made to vaccinate other populations first. But how is it that funeral directors, hospital discharge planners, firefighters and other frontline and congregate care setting staff have begun receiving the vaccine and assisted living workers serving very frail elderly residents have not? More shocking are recent reports that hospitals are hoarding the vaccine for all their staff and rejecting pleas to offer it to other critical health care workers in the community.

This is unconscionable and illogical considering the vulnerable resident population served.  Assisted living residents and staff deserve better. Vaccines should be made available to staff immediately and residents as soon thereafter as the supply grows.  Otherwise, the state unnecessarily risks a repeat of the large number of nursing home resident deaths that occurred in the beginning months of the pandemic.

Lisa Newcomb is Executive Director of the Empire State Association of Assisted Living (ESAAL), comprised of over 300 Adult Care Facilities throughout New York State, serving more than 30,000 residents. Contact Lisa at ESAAL 518-371-2573 ext. 203.

Sign up for Long Island Press’ email newsletters hereSign up for home delivery of Long Island Press here. Sign up for discounts by becoming a Long Island Press community partner here.

The Weekender: What to do on Long Island Jan. 1-3

Getty Images

CRESLI SEAL WALKS 
The Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island will be hosting informational walks and talks about seals at Cupsogue Beach County Park in Westhampton, where participants can also view and photograph seals. Proceeds will go to coastal research efforts. 975 Dune Rd., Westhampton Beach. cresli.org $3-$5 suggested donation. Now-May 2.

NEW YEAR’S HIKE
Experience the winter solitude of Montauk’s 3,000-acre Hither Woods in this day-after-New-Year’s 8-mile hike. The East Hampton Trails Preservation Society will hike past such famous features as Split Rock, the Devil’s Cradle and Ram Level before reaching Rod’s Valley on the shore of Fort Pond Bay. Meet at the Hither Hills Overlook parking lot, north side of Route 27. Bring food, liquids and a face mask. Call Rick Whalen at 631-267-6608 or email richardwhalen@optonline.net to register. Hither Woods Preserve, Montauk. ehtps.org 10 a.m. Jan. 2.

SUPERHEROES OF THE SKY
Meet Sweetbriar Nature Center’s birds of prey on this educational walking tour. Proceeds go to food and medicine for the nature center’s animals. 62 Eckernkamp Dr., Smithtown. sweetbriarnc.org $5-$10. 11 a.m. Jan. 2.

SIGNIFICANCE OF KWANZAA 
Ama Karikari-Yawson, founder of Milestales, will introduce the principles, practice and history of the traditions of Kwanzaa in this enlightening Zoom session. riverheadlibrary.org 2 p.m. Jan. 2.

Related Story: New Year’s Day Events on Long Island 2021

Related Story: Top 5 Live Events on the East End: New Year’s Weekend 2021

Related Story: Top 5 Virtual Events on the East End: New Year’s Weekend 2021

For more entertainment coverage visit longislandpress.com/category/entertainment

Sign up for Long Island Press’ email newsletters hereSign up for home delivery of Long Island Press here. Sign up for discounts by becoming a Long Island Press community partner here.

Long Island Press Seeking Interns for 2021

The Long Island Press is seeking interns to work in the editorial department of the region’s premier news and lifestyle publication covering Nassau and Suffolk counties.

The Press, which has a history dating back two centuries, has earned hundreds of honors from local, New York State, and national journalism organizations for its editorial excellence. 

The Press is owned by Bayside-based Schneps Media, one of the largest local news chains in New York State with more than 70 newspapers and websites across LI, New York City, Westchester, and Philadelphia. Sister publications include the Queens Courier, The Brooklyn Paper, The Bronx Times, and many more.

Interns at the Press will get hands-on newsroom experience working with seasoned professionals. They will research, report, and write news and feature stories to be published in the monthly print edition as well as on the daily website. Prior Press interns have gone on to write for The New York Daily News, Newsday, and The New York Times.

Spring internships are available from late January through April, summer internships run from May to August, and fall internships are open September to December. Applicants should be college students majoring in English, journalism, or communications. Experience writing for a school newspaper is encouraged, but not required.

Applicants can email their resume, cover letter, and writing samples to Editor-In-Chief Timothy Bolger at tbolger@longislandpress.com

Sign up for Long Island Press’ email newsletters hereSign up for home delivery of Long Island Press here. Sign up for discounts by becoming a Long Island Press community partner here.

2022 Best of Long Island Contest Nominations Now Being Accepted

Those looking to nominate their favorite local businesses and people in the coveted 2022 Bethpage Best of Long Island contest need to submit nominees by August 31.

The competition is fierce, as evident by the tens of thousands of nominations made in last year’s contest. Nominations are made by visiting bestof.longislandpress.com, clicking the “Nominate Now” button and entering the name and contact information for the local business or person you want to enter into the contest.

Once the nomination period closes, the top nominees will be advanced to the official ballot. The voting period runs from Oct. 1 through Dec. 15. Each of the dozens of categories will have one local winner and, where applicable, one national winner. The winners of the 2021 contest will be announced early next year.

Sponsored by Bethpage Federal Credit Union, the 18th annual Bethpage Best of Long Island competition has grown into the largest business awards program in the history of LI.

The contest offers participants a chance to nominate and vote on businesses in dozens of subcategories within each category, ranging from restaurants to automotive and everything in between.

Good luck!

To find all the other 2020 Bethpage Best of Long Island contest winners, visit bestoflongisland.com 

To read Best of Long Island Spotlights, visit longislandpress.com/category/boli-spotlight

Sign up for Long Island Press’ email newsletters hereSign up for home delivery of Long Island Press here. Sign up for discounts by becoming a Long Island Press community partner here.

Top 10 Long Island News Stories of 2020

Getty Images

10. GARBARINO REPLACES KING

L. t R.: New York State Assmblyman Andrew Garbarino (R-Sayville) and former Babylon Town Councilwoman Jackie Gordon (D-Copiague). Photos courtesy of New York State Assembly and Olivia Vecchio

New York State Assemblyman Andrew Garbarino (R-Sayville) won the race against Democrat and former Babylon Town Councilwoman Jackie Gordon for retiring U.S. Rep. Peter King (R-Seaford)’s seat in Congressional District 2. The race to replace King, a 14-term congressman, was among the most-watched races in the nation as Democrats sought to flip the seat into their majority in the U.S. House of Representatives. Garbarino had declared victory on election night, but Gordon waited to concede until elections officials counted the unusually large amount of absentee ballots mailed in this year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

9. WEIK UNSEATS MARTINEZ

L. to R.: Monica Martinez and Alexis Weik.

Republican former Islip Town Tax Receiver Alexis Weik ousted freshman New York State Sen. Monica Martinez (D-Brentwood) a month after Election Day once absentee ballots were counted. Martinez, a former Suffolk County legislator and school administrator, may already be plotting a rematch in the 2022 election. “Monica Martinez will be back, if I have anything to do with it,” Jay Jacobs, who chairs the New York State and Nassau County Democratic committees, told the Press. “Her district has lost a great senator — for now.”

8. LI PLAINTIFF WINS DACA CASE

Demonstrators rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court as justices were scheduled to hear oral arguments in the consolidation of three cases before the court regarding the Trump administration’s bid to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in Washington, U.S., November 12, 2019. (REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst/File Photo)

June brought good news for an immigration advocate from Patchogue who sued to block the Trump administration’s decision to end a program that protects from deportation hundreds of thousands of young immigrants — the Supreme Court ruled in her favor. Eliana Fernández, an Ecuadorean immigrant and lead organizer of nonprofit Make The Road New York, was among a half dozen plaintiffs who sued to reverse President Donald Trump’s rescinding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program that shields from deportation children, dubbed “Dreamers,” brought to the U.S. by undocumented immigrants. The justice’s 5-4 vote upholds a lower court’s ruling that Trump’s move to end the program was unlawful. 

7. LI CASE DELIVERS SCOTUS WIN FOR LGBTQ+ RIGHTS

David Kilmnick holds up a photo of Donald Zarda at the Hauppauge office of the Long Island LGBT Network on Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019. (Long Island Press photo)

Also in June, the U.S. Supreme Court cited the case of a man who claimed Long Island Skydive fired him for being gay in the top court’s ruling that extended federal anti-discrimination protections on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. The U.S. Supreme Court cited the case of a man who claimed Long Island Skydive fired him for being gay in the top court’s ruling that extend federal anti-discrimination protections on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. The Zarda case is one of three LGBT discrimination cases that the Supreme Court heard on the issue. 

6. THOMAS VALVA DIES

Thomas Valva

Back in January, a New York City police officer from Center Moriches and his fiancée were arrested in connection with the death of the man’s 8-year-old son, Thomas Valva. Michael Valva, 40, and his 42-year-old fiancée, Angela Pollina, were charged with second-degree murder. Suffolk police alleged the boy died after being left in the unheated garage of the house overnight in freezing temperatures. The incident led to Suffolk County legislators proposing systemic changes to the way Child Protective Services operates.

5. GRUMMAN AGREES TO PLUME CLEAN-UP

bethpage toxic plume
Shutterstock photo

Earlier this month, Northrop Grumman and the U.S. Navy came to a $406 million agreement to conduct a full aquifer protection clean up project to eliminate groundwater pollution at the former Grumman Aerospace site in Bethpage. After a decades-long fight to curb what’s referred to as the toxic “Grumman plume,” the decision marks a significant victory for environmentalists, Long Island water districts, and elected officials. The plan to cure the aquifer contamination will span 30 years.

4. DIOCESE FILES FOR BANKRUPTCY

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Rockville Centre’s headquarters on Sunrise Highway.

In October, the Diocese of Rockville Centre filed for bankruptcy after more than 200 lawsuits were filed alleging Catholic priests on Long Island sexually abused victims over the years. Attorneys for the victims blasted church leaders for the move, which the critics characterized as a legal delay tactic, while church leaders maintained that the filing was necessary as litigation costs pile up. Church operations were expected to continue as normal during the proceedings.

3. ISAIAS STRIKES LI

Tropical Storm Isaias blew into Long Island with strong winds on Aug. 4, leaving more than 400,000 homes and businesses without power, blocked roads with downed trees, and prompted the Long Island Rail Road to suspend service. PSEG-LI received the brunt of the blame for ongoing power outages from several local officials. New York State quickly launched an investigation into the electric company’s response following widespread communications issues when customers tried to report power outages to the utility.

2. FLOYD PROTESTERS TAKE TO LI STREETS

Protestors kneel on Merrick Avenue in Merrick. (Photo by Mira Lerner)

After the police killing of George Floyd in late May, Black Lives Matter protests erupted across the country, including on Long Island. Thousands gathered at marches and demonstrations all over Long Island as activists were energized to call for change, some of which were answered when New York State lawmakers passed police reforms in June. Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed into law a 10-bill legislative package that included a ban on police using chokeholds, mandated that New York State Police wear body cameras, and designating as hate crimes false accusations made to 911 based on religion, race, or other identifiers.

1. AND OF COURSE, COVID-19

Healthcare workers wheel the bodies of deceased people from the Wyckoff Heights Medical Center during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the Brooklyn borough of New York City, New York, U.S., April 4, 2020. (REUTERS/Andrew Kelly/File Photo)

The biggest news story, one that will define 2020 for generations to come, is the coronavirus pandemic. Its impacts on public health, the economy, and our society are immeasurable. Long Island’s first Covid-19 case was confirmed in early March. Not long after, schools, businesses, and offices began shutting down. Later on, it was suspected that the first case on Long Island actually emerged in February. The height of the pandemic in April was brutal for hospital workers who cared for Covid-19 patients, many of whom were severely ill and could not see family because of the no-visitor policies. Though New York has improved in Covid-19 cases from the spring, the pandemic continues; it will be surprising if Covid-19 does not make this list in 2021. However, the news may be brighter. On Dec. 14, the light at the end of the tunnel appeared: the first vaccination in New York was administered at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park.

Sign up for Long Island Press’ email newsletters hereSign up for home delivery of Long Island Press here. Sign up for discounts by becoming a Long Island Press community partner here.

What is The Best Wine Bar on Long Island?

When you want to uncork some of life’s best pleasures, there’s nothing better than savoring the gifts that vintage grapes, aged to perfection, can bring to our lips. But which local wine bar is the best?

Long Islanders voted The Wine Cellar on Main Best Wine Bar or Cellar on Long Island in the 2020 Bethpage Best of Long Island contest for the second year in a row!

A glass of wine can turn a tiring day into a relaxing evening. The Wine Cellar on Main in Northport carries an extensive selection of the finest reds and whites from local wineries and around the globe.

Not sure what blend pleases the palate? Not a problem. They offer flights so you can see what tickles your fancy.

The Wine Cellar on Main’s comfortable atmosphere, tasty wines and light fare are just right for any occasion, whether you’re in the mood for a leisurely Sparkling Pinot Noir Rose from Austria, a delicious Argentinian Malbec with a small bite, or a Late Harvest Moscatel from Spain along with a tasty treat. Who can say no to that?

The Wine Cellar on Main is located at 70 Main St. in Northport. It can be reached at 631-651-5555 or thewinecellaronmain.com

To find all the other 2020 Bethpage Best of Long Island contest winners, visit bestoflongisland.com Nominate your favorite businesses and people in the 2022 Bethpage Best of Long Island program starting Jan. 1.

To read more Best of Long Island Spotlights, visit longislandpress.com/category/boli-spotlight

Sign up for Long Island Press’ email newsletters hereSign up for home delivery of Long Island Press here. Sign up for discounts by becoming a Long Island Press community partner here.

2020 People of The Year: Long Island Healthcare Heroes

healthcare heroes
Nurse Annabelle Jimenez, congratulates nurse Sandra Lindsay after she is inoculated with the Covid-19 vaccine, at Northwell Health at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park. (Mark Lennihan/Pool via Reuters)

Heroic. That is the best word to describe the selfless acts that doctors, nurses, and other medical professionals have performed while bravely serving on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic.

Since the first Covid-19 case was confirmed on Long Island in March, countless stories have emerged describing the heart-wrenching decisions medics have had to make, such as holding patients’ hands as they die alone because family members were unable to visit due to restrictions meant to curb the virus’ spread.

For their efforts, the Press has deemed LI healthcare heroes “People of The Year” for 2020. These are some of their stories.

THE TRAVELING NURSE

The coronavirus pandemic has restricted almost everyone’s freedoms in America, but for Meghan Lindsey it has done the opposite. This is the freest she has ever felt.

Traveling to New York at age 33 to work as a Covid-19 nurse was the first time that Meghan, a married mother of two, had ever left southwest Missouri.

“It was my first time on a plane,” she said, describing how she came to work 12-hour shifts in the intensive care unit at NYU Winthrop Hospital, now known as NYU Langone Hospital – Long Island, in Mineola. “Flying into New York was the first time I’d ever seen the ocean.”

There are many stories about the lonely coronavirus deaths in the city’s hospitals and the traumatic work of the nurses who staff them.

Meghan’s story is about unexpected opportunities. It’s a story of how the pandemic gave a woman the chance to strike out into the world, confront danger and make a difference, and how her husband stayed home to care for their daughters. It’s a story about new beginnings.

“This was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to do something meaningful,” said Meghan Lindsey.

“I always wanted to do something for my country,” said Meghan. “This was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to do something meaningful.”

Meghan’s first nursing shifts in New York were a shock.

There are a lot of sick people in Missouri with chronic diseases like diabetes, where the progressions are slow and the declines are familiar. COVID-19 patients are stunned by a virus that turns their lives upside down and in many cases ends them.

“One of my patients had her toes done up all nice and pretty and still had her jewelry on,” said Meghan.

Because they were coronavirus patients and visitors were banned, it was Meghan who would hold their hands as they died.

“Once you FaceTime and you meet their family and you hear them crying and sobbing, you know their cute little nicknames and you start to know them, it just gets to be really personal,” said Meghan. “You have a hard time separating yourself and not truly grieving for them as well.”

Despite all the death, Meghan’s time in New York’s Covid-19 wards was unexpectedly affirming. The pandemic gave Meghan something that her life in Missouri so far had not: a feeling of everything sliding into place.

When Meghan graduated from nursing school, it wasn’t as she imagined. It turned out to be just a job. She mourned.

“Now for once, it’s actually something important,” said Meghan. “This is the first time since I’ve become a nurse that it’s like, ‘Yes, this is why.’ I can make a difference, and I can help, and I am strong enough for this.”

Her kids, she said, are proud of her. “They know that what I’m doing is hard and that I put my life in danger.”

Meghan often wondered if she should come home. Her husband Aaron told her no. He and the girls were fine, what she was doing mattered and he was proud of her. He sometimes called her “superwoman.”

“If he wasn’t such a good dad and there for my children, I could never do this,” said Meghan. 

Traveling nurse Meghan Lindsey embraces her daughters Braelyn, 9, and Avery, 6, after being away for five weeks, upon her arrival in Fayetteville, Arkansas on May 16, 2020. (Shannon Stapleton/Reuters)

THE PEDIATRICIAN

When a 3-year-old patient of New York pediatrician Dr. Greg Gulbransen dislocated her arm, he told her parents not to take her to the emergency care center, fearing that going there could put the family at risk of contracting Covid-19.

Instead, he said, he met them on their front lawn, where he popped the girl’s joint back in.

“It is a very easy thing to do, but it made a huge difference for them,” he said.

Gulbransen has had to rethink how he runs his pediatric practice on Long Island since the coronavirus crisis started.

He said he was worried about his pediatric patients picking up on their parents’ anxieties, as well as the health and financial welfare of his staff.

“The anxiety level is palpable,” said Gulbransen.

“But it’s a privilege,” he said, adding, “you’re here for your patients. You gotta push and do whatever it takes.”

THE PHYSICIAN’S ASSISTANT

“Home soon,” Madhvi Aya of Floral Park texted from her hospital bed. “Love you.”

It was the last exchange she had with her only daughter, 18-year-old Minnoli. Three days later, Madhvi Aya died of Covid-19.

Aya, 61, was a physician assistant who had treated patients with the coronavirus. Then she became a patient herself.

She was admitted to Long Island Jewish Medical Center on March 18 after being infected and died 11 days later. Her family believes she contracted the respiratory illness at her workplace — the emergency room at Woodhull Medical and Mental Health Center in Brooklyn.

She told her husband and daughter that she had treated infected patients while wearing only a surgical mask, which offers little protection from airborne infection. Woodhull hospital declined to comment on Aya’s case or whether the facility had been able to provide its staff with enough protective gear amid widespread shortages nationally.

Aya is among dozens of U.S. healthcare workers identified by Reuters as having died after being diagnosed with or showing symptoms of the virus. They include nurses, doctors and technicians who have died in the United States after contracting the disease, according to interviews with hospitals, union representatives and families and a Reuters review of local media reports and obituaries.

There’s no official tally of the deaths among U.S. healthcare workers, and the total could be much higher than the number counted by Reuters.

FIRST VACCINE

An employee at Northwell Health’s Long Island Jewish Medical Center gave Pfizer’s Covid-19 vaccine to the first New Yorkers to receive the vaccine on Dec. 14. Sandra Lindsay, a critical care nurse at the New Hyde Park hospital, was the first person to get the vaccine in the state and the nation.

“I feel hopeful today,” Lindsay said. “Relieved.”

Michelle Chester, Northwell’s director of employee health services, administered it in the presence of Northwell president and CEO Michael Dowling. 

“This is a special moment, a special day,” Dowling said. “This is what everybody’s been waiting for — to be able to give the vaccine, and hopefully this is the beginning of the end of the Covid issue.”

Chester took just one minute to prepare and administer the vaccine, an effort that was met by applause and cheers from Gov. Andrew Cuomo and staff on-site at LIJ, including Lindsay herself.

“It didn’t feel any different from taking any other vaccine,” Lindsay said. “… We all need to do our part to put an end to the pandemic, and to not give up so soon.

“There’s light at the end of the tunnel,” she continued, “but we still need to continue to wear our masks, to social distance … I trust science. What I don’t trust is that if I contract Covid, how it will impact me or those who I come in contact with. So I encourage everyone to take the vaccine.”

-With Reuters and Briana Bonfiglio 

For more coronavirus coverage, visit longislandpress.com/coronavirus

Sign up for Long Island Press’ email newsletters here. Sign up for home delivery of Long Island Press here. Sign up for discounts by becoming a Long Island Press community partner here.

Luxurious Waterfront Home in Merrick Asks $2.6M

waterfront home

A waterfront home with luxurious amenities is for sale at 2243 Halyard Dr. in Merrick.

The property was built in 1975 with a refined mix of stone, stucco, and vinyl siding. Its exterior is a dull yellow and light beige with light-colored stones, plus an off-white, two-car garage.

The home’s interior and exterior railings all have the same wrought iron design, which matches the front double doors and window above it on the second floor. Inside, there’s an entrance foyer with cathedral ceilings and a chandelier. 

Now, here’s the exciting part: this impressive house has a professional, 12-seat theater and a spa with a sauna. Outside, the inground pool is as close to the waterfront as can be with plenty of room for lounging by the bay.

The house, on the corner of a row of bayside homes, has a long, private pier for boat docking. Plus, there’s an outdoor cooking space with a grill and countertops in the backyard, which is partially lined with pavers and finished off with a sturdy deck behind the pool.

Views of the water can be seen at every angle from the home’s semi-circle wall design that has several windows on each floor.

The home also has neat landscaping, an exercise room, formal dining room, guest quarters, a home office, powder room, walk-in closets, and a wet bar. The large, eat-in kitchen has granite countertops and an island with its own sink and cabinets.

The asking price is $2,625,000, not including the annual property tax of $50,803.

The real estate agents listed for the property are Louise and Seth Pitlake, of Douglas Elliman Real Estate, who can be reached at 516-623-4500.

waterfront home

For more real estate news, visit longislandpress.com/category/real-estate.

Sign up for Long Island Press’ email newsletters hereSign up for home delivery of Long Island Press here. Sign up for discounts by becoming a Long Island Press community partner here.

What Are The Best Gyms on Long Island?

best gyms on long island
Getty Images

You voted, they won. Here are the 2020 Best of Long Island winners for best gyms. (2021 winners to be announced.)

BEST BOOT CAMP

Fit Body Boot Camp – Farmingdale

Fit Body Boot Camp has been recognized as one of the world’s fastest-growing fitness boot camp brands, offering members around the world affordable, convenient, 30-minute fat-loss boot camps that challenge the body and deliver results every time. At the Farmingdale location, specialized afterburner workouts use a combination of High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) and Active Rest Training to get your body to burn up to twice the fat and calories that traditional workouts burn, in only half the time. FBBC also keeps your metabolism working at a higher rate for up to 32 hours after each workout. Every group training session is led by an experienced and certified personal trainer and is designed to be fun, high energy, and challenging, so that you burn the most fat possible and tone your muscles. 1815B Broadhollow Rd., Farmingdale, 631-213-7092, fitbodybootcamp.com

BEST CROSSFIT

CrossFit Suffolk – Holbrook

For the ultimate CrossFit experience, CrossFit Suffolk – Holbrook looks to train members to achieve a level of fitness not thought possible. The staff wants to foster a “culture of fitness” and do so in a challenging, supportive environment, improving fitness regardless of your current level. Workouts are customized to fit your needs and capabilities. You’ll find true training as opposed to being shown a few exercises and being left to fend for yourself. CrossFit Suffolk is not your typical gym. Your training will always be always guided and supervised by its trainers so that you can become stronger, faster, more flexible, and better functioning. 5006 Veterans Hwy. #6, Holbrook, 631-747-6038, spartanperformance.com

BEST GYM

SpinCity Massapequa

Not a fan of running on a treadmill? Don’t fret! At SpinCity Massapequa, you can jumpstart your workout by taking any cycling classes that will have you feeling the burn in no time while feeling a burst of adrenaline surge through your body. Through 50-minute classes, prepare to get completely lost in the moment. Ride to the beat of the song. Ride to sprints, hills, strength and endurance. Ride with a pair of 3-pound free weights if you choose. But most of all, ride with an open heart and an open mind. All cycling classes must be booked in advance, so don’t miss out on reserving your bike today! 1027a Park Blvd., Massapequa Park, 516-809-7744, spincitymassapequa.com

BEST YOGA STUDIO

Revolution Yoga

Achieve mindfulness while working on your core and improving your flexibility at Revolution Yoga. Each one-hour and 15-minute long class varies from gentle in intensity for beginners, to more intermediate and advanced classes for experienced yogis. The yoga classes offered range from vinyasa — the most common practice designed to bring together breath and movement — to hatha, restorative, and kids yoga. Your practice will feel more and more organic as your body gradually opens in flexibility and builds strength as the practice progresses. The instructors at Revolution Yoga will ensure that their students receive a dose of vinyasa karma, where every pose builds safely to the next. 7 N. Village Ave., Rockville Centre, 516-619-6421, revolutionyogaspace.com

BEST ZUMBA STUDIO

Laura’s Dance & Fitness Studio

Located in Huntington, Laura’s Dance and Fitness Studio specializes in dance classes, group fitness classes, personal training, and birthday parties. There are hour-long Zumba classes four days a week in the state-of-the-art dance studio. Owner and operator Laura Marciano has received several awards for her dancing and was recently named one of Long Island’s Top 30 Young Professionals under 30. The studio also holds parties, including Zumba parties designed for adults and children! 586 New York Ave., Huntington, 631-824-6259, laurasdanceandfitnessstudio.com

Sign up for Long Island Press’ email newsletters here. Sign up for home delivery of Long Island Press here. Sign up for discounts by becoming a Long Island Press community partner here.

What is The Best Gourmet Food Store on Long Island?

Getty Images

Gourmet gift baskets also make great presents for family, friends, and co-workers around the holiday season. But what is the best gourmet food store on Long Island to find one?

Long Islanders voted Uncle Giuseppe’s the winner of Best Gourmet Food Store on Long Island in the 2020 Bethpage Best of Long Island contest, a title the store has won repeatedly over the years!

Uncle Giuseppe’s opened its first gourmet food store in 1998 in East Meadow. For the past 22 years, the company has earned a reputation for selling tasty food made with old-fashioned Italian recipes and high-quality ingredients. Their stores are complete with a fully stocked meat department, deli, produce department, bakery, seafood department, frozen aisle and cheese section, making it a one-stop shop for every shopper’s needs.

At Uncle Giuseppe’s, the staff believes that they are not only a grocery store, but also a place where customers are treated like family. Over two decades since it first opened, Uncle Giuseppe’s now has eight locations in New York State and New Jersey, including its original locations in East Meadow, Massapequa, Mellville, and Port Washington.

Uncle Giuseppe’s has multiple locations that can be found at uncleg.com

To find all the other 2020 Bethpage Best of Long Island contest winners, visit bestoflongisland.com Nominate your favorite businesses and people in the 2022 Bethpage Best of Long Island program starting Jan. 1.

To read more Best of Long Island Spotlights, visit longislandpress.com/category/boli-spotlight

Sign up for Long Island Press’ email newsletters hereSign up for home delivery of Long Island Press here. Sign up for discounts by becoming a Long Island Press community partner here.